10 Timeless Kitchen Trends That Will Never Go Out Of Style

kitchen trends

10 Timeless Kitchen Trends That Will Never Go Out Of Style

By Jennifer Geddes

So if you want a kitchen you’ll love for years to come (or maybe even sell sometime in the future), it’s smart to stick with what’s tried and true. To help in this endeavor, our “Timeless Home Design Trends” series tackles your design conundrums room by room. Here are the top 10 kitchen trends where you can’t go wrong.

1. White cabinets

Whether you choose glossy acrylic or matte, white cabinets always looks clean and fresh, points out Ana Cummings of the eponymous design firm. And frankly, how many dark or black kitchens have you ever seen?

Lean hard on white if you’re redoing your cook space because the shade helps to reflect light, making your room look larger. And a white kitchen goes with every other color or texture you’d like to bring in, making this spot an easy one to design.

2. Marble counters

Marble is the Energizer Bunny of the kitchen world—it just keeps going and going and going.

“It’s really impressive to see centuries-old buildings in Europe made from marble, so you know this material is going to last in your kitchen just fine,” says Cummings.

Many homeowners prefer this counter material, even though it’s porous and maintenance can be a headache.

If you’re looking for an alternative, try white quartzite.

“It looks like marble, but it’s more durable—or consider engineered quartz like Caesarstone, which is amenable to mitering,” says Debra Kling, a home interior pro and color consultant.

3. Stainless-steel appliances

This material is a classic in part because it goes with many modern, streamlined styles as well as more ornate kitchens too, notes Amy Bly of Great Impressions Home Staging and Interiors.

“This [type of] appliance also reads cool and clean, so it’s a solid choice for an upgraded look,” adds Cummings.

And fortunately for tidy homeowners, some stainless steel requires less  maintenance as technology has improved, and even stainless-steel appliances that are fingerprint-free are available. This beauty ($3,399, Home Depot) promises to keep your produce extra fresh, will accommodate large platters, and features an interior water dispenser so as not to mar the smooth exterior design.

4. Shaker-style cabinets

Keep it simple, people, and stick with flat-front Shaker designs (like this one from Lowe’s) when considering cabinet styles in the kitchen.

“This look is ubiquitous and feels safest for most homeowners—and while Shaker cabinets feel somewhat modern, they also combine well with rustic elements like open shelves,” notes Kling.

5. Subway tile

Subway tile has it all: It’s easy to install, it’s relatively inexpensive, and it has a pleasant pattern that doesn’t compete for visual attention, says Cummings.

Not sure you love these rectangles? Try the 4-by-4-inch white squares or hexagon versions, suggests Kling.

6. Open shelving

Despite the cons that crop up when people think about open shelving (dust collects, items need frequent straightening), open shelves are here to stay. And installing them breaks up the monotony of a long row of upper cabinets, allowing you a spot for interesting, thoughtful displays, says Cummings.

7. Kitchen islands

Whether your island is a free-standing table or a built-in behemoth, few homeowners are willing to cast this expansive workspace and storage space aside. Choose from natural wood, painted finishes, or brightly colored lacquers.

8. Hardwood floors

Real wood is beautiful thanks to the various shades, visual texture, and natural grains. And home buyers tend to favor real wood, so installing them can increase your home’s value. Hardwood floors are also softer underfoot than stone or tile, saving wear and tear on your back and knees.

9. Oversize sinks

“Why, I’d love a tiny sink where I can wash a bulky lasagna pan and a big pile of spinach,” said no one, ever.

A large, deep sink is just plain practical, so go for the biggest, nicest one you can afford—and you won’t be sorry. An apron-front or farmhouse-style sink will go the distance, especially this single-bowl stunner made from fireclay ($1,029.99, Wayfair).

10. Integrated appliances

A wall of built-in, coordinating cabinet fronts that hide your dishwasher and fridge may seem dull and matchy-matchy, but this streamlined, seamless look is definitely timeless.

Integrated appliances are less bulky than, say, a fridge that stands alone, and they save space (a cabinet can become a freezer). And syncing cabinets with appliance fronts adds more warmth than a bunch of metal can.

[divider_top]

The Renovation Dilemma: What to Fix If You’re Selling

the renovation dilemma what to fix if youre selling

By: Deborah Kearns

It’s always a Sisyphean task to set a budget for a renovation—or at the very least an ever-moving target—but if you’re planning to put your home on the market, you’ll have a way different set of calculations than a starry-eyed new homeowner.

Before you embark on a gut of your circa-1990 kitchen, consult with a Realtor® and a general contractor about which renovations will yield the biggest return on investment. How much work you’ll need depends on your home’s value, your market, and the comps in your neighborhood.

“In competitive markets where prices are through the roof, like San Francisco or New York City, you don’t really need to do renovations before selling,” says Mike Aubrey, a Realtor with Long & Foster Real Estate in Gaithersburg, MD. “But in other places where inventory is going up, your house needs to measure up to the other listings on the market.”

Committed to doing some work? Start by thinking small. Minor cosmetic upgrades go a long way in getting more buyers through the door for a quicker sale—and time on market is key to determining what you’ll net at closing.

Where to start? Here are some suggested upgrades (and some to avoid):

Walls and floors

Replacing or refinishing your flooring and painting the walls are the quickest and least expensive ways to give a house new life, Aubrey says. With these enhancements, you can expect roughly a 15% uptick in asking price.

Paint color matters. Shades of gray are in with buyers right now; stay away from tan and beige hues—they scream the era of Bill Clinton and Seattle grunge, Aubrey says. While you can certainly go the DIY route with paint, hiring a pro will get the best results. Expect to spend $2,000 to $3,000 for whole-house interior painting, Aubrey says.

The same goes for new carpet. A sturdy, builder-grade fiber in a neutral color that doesn’t compete with your wall color is the way to go. While most buyers prefer hardwood floors, they’re pricey to install. If you have existing hardwood floors, refinishing them will bring back the luster.

If you live in an area where ceramic tile is the standard (hey, we’re looking at you, Florida), a less expensive and durable option is DuraCeramic, an engineered tile that mimics the look of ceramic without the high cost, Aubrey says. You can find it for less than $3 per square foot.

Doors

According to Remodeling magazine’s 2015 Cost vs. Value Report, replacing your existing front door with a new steel door will net you a 101.8% return on resale for a minimal replacement cost of about $1,230. Who knew? But think about it: It’s the first and last thing you’ll touch on your home visit. It makes an impression.

Installing a new garage door has an impact on buyers, too. Even better: It offers an 88% return at resale and costs an average of about $1,600 to replace, according to the Remodeling report.

Roof and siding

Adding a new roof and replacing your home’s unsightly vinyl siding will also yield a high ROI, Aubrey says. His assertion is backed by the Cost vs. Value Report, which found that homeowners recouped 72% and 80% of the cost, respectively, for those upgrades. Another benefit: When it comes time for inspection and appraisal, having those repairs done will not only increase the value of your home but also reduce the likelihood of being forced to make fixes or adjust pricing later in the process.

Kitchens

A modern kitchen is a top draw for buyers—but don’t try to overhaul a dated one, which could cost mucho dinero. Buying new cabinet drawer pulls, painting or refacing old cabinets (white is in right now), and installing sleek light fixtures are all low-cost upgrades that will make your kitchen sparkle.

New appliances, which can run about $10,000 for a whole-kitchen replacement, are an easy way to add value. While the upfront cost might be hard to swallow, new stainless appliances make your kitchen more attractive to a wider range of buyers, says Ashley Oakes-Lazosky, a Realtor with Vegas Homes and Fine Estates in Las Vegas.

Granite or quartz countertops are also hot, but they can be pricey, depending on your kitchen layout.

“You need bids from professional remodelers to figure out how much new countertops will cost—and if it fits your budget and timetable for selling,” says Robert Criner, chairman of the National Association of Home Builders Remodelers and owner of Criner Remodeling in Newport News, VA.

A less pricey alternative is simply adding a clean, white ceramic tile backsplash to create visual appeal, Criner adds.

Upgrades to skip

Thinking about finishing an attic or basement? Adding a deck? Well, don’t. Those upgrades tend to be pricey, and buyers will likely prefer to remodel those areas to their own tastes.

Other areas to avoid doing a major renovation: bathrooms, bedrooms, and home offices, according the Remodeling report.

In other words, if it ain’t broke, don’t renovate it!

 

[divider_top]